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of the modern state of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans tender civil rights movement. stone wall is the stonewall is really the way this movement kicked off. host: richard, connecticut, independent line. caller: i do not understand why you don't have someone from the opposition to this gentleman on the show, because it is is somewhat controversial subject and you have one view. that is very obvious to anyone watching the show. a second point is that, internationally, people like this gentleman who have support in the united states -- in many countries against the nets is, if you got now, ukraine, russia, hungary, dozens and dozens of nations are looking at the united states as an evil mention because tunnel men like this person -- gentleman like this person, " have lots of money and have more money than average americans, are going into these nations and promoting the homosexual lifestyle. in russia, they had a riot and had to shut down our professed homosexual demonstration in -- shut down a pro-homosexual demonstration because, was funded b -- was funded by american groups. and
is a collective biography of six african american civil rights lawyers who practice law during the era of segregation. it's about the collective struggles with civil rights and racial identities. it's about the fact that to be an african american civil rights lawyer in this era i argue in the book is to be caught between the black-and-white world. both blacks and whites want things. and identify with these particular lawyers. so to be as kind of a lawyer, thurgood marshall and people like him was to not just be an african-american lawyer. >> how difficult was it for an african american to become a lawyer during this time? >> is not difficult to become a lawyer. you have to go to law school like everybody else. it does cost money. but it is very difficult to succeed as a lawyer because no african-american lawyer is going to have white clients to more very few of them will have white clients. most black people don't have a lot of money. if you have money and you're black you hire a lawyer because, of course, when lawyers will be more effective in a segregated society. very difficult to s
. he also reminds us of our history. there has been no civil rights or human rights movement in which the faith communities and its leaders have not been at the forefront and i look at dr. and he is a living reminder of that truth. at the heart of civil rights movement in the years 1963 and 1964 before there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun out of control, and we did. for almost a quarter of a century we have opened our congregation doors, fed and provided a warm and safe place for homeless men to
stand on the shoulders of the great men and women of the civil right era who made this possible. even early on, many of the civil rights leaders early on in the primary process were with hillary clinton and it took a while for them to trust him and know who he was. and he used a lot of that conversation saying, look, because of you all, i am possible. and i remember we saw congressman lewis there, he was one of the people who had sort of that great turmoil because he was originally for hillary, then he said his consciousness, he changed for barack obama. i think the president gets it, he understands it, and he's very respectful of it. >> i also think about, he spoke about the fierce urgency of now early on. for many in the gay community in the united states, they didn't feel that he had that sense of fierce urgency. i think today after the speech, i think there are a lot of gay and lesbian americans who were surprised to hear a president use the word stonewall and use it in the same sentence as selma and seneca falls and would certainly argue that he now has a sense of fierce urgency
address and chronicles america's struggles for civil rights. i'll talk about the cultural impact of today's speech with jonathan altar and james peterson. stay tuned. you're watching the "ed show" on msnbc from washington. [ fishing rod casting line, marching band playing ] [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is karen and jeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they're gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritr
makes history in his second inaugural address and chronicles america's struggles for civil rights. i'll talk about the cultural impact of today's speech with jonathan alter and james peterson. stay tuned. you're watching the "ed show" on msnbc from washington. [ female announcer ] going to sleep may be easy, but when you wake up in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective sleep medicine you don't take before bedtime. take it in bed only when you need it and have at least four hours left for sleep. do not take intermezzo if you have had an allergic reaction to drugs containing zolpidem, such as ambien. allergic reactions such as shortness of breath or swelling of your tongue or throat may occur and may be fatal. intermezzo should not be taken if you have taken another sleep medicine at bedtime or in the middle of the night or drank alcohol that day. do not drive or operate mac
rights and the -- religion and civil rights and they are the only state that doesn't allow gay marriage. >>> it is just a big hole in the ground now, why many say the miracle on jones street will happen again even bigger and better. >> our next question from john from baltimore. >> a priceless moment during a radio interview with jim harbaugh's mother, a surprise guest and you will hear the question that pretty much stole the show. look at you guys with your fancy-schmancy u-verse high speed internet. you know, in my day you couldn't just start streaming six ways to sunday. you'd get knocked off. and sometimes, it took a minute to download a song. that's sixty seconds, for crying out loud. we know how long a minute is! sitting, waiting for an album to download. i still have back problems. you're only 14 and a half. he doesn't have back problems. you kids have got it too good if you ask me. [ male announcer ] now u-verse high speed internet has more speed options, reliability and ways to connect. rethink possible. >>> they call it sacred ground, serving free meals to millions of people,
become the largest and most important civil rights protest in the world. [applause] please join me in welcoming the new president of the march for life, jeanne monahan. [applause] >> thank you. is anybody cold out there? [laughter] it is a little chilly, right? is ok. we are here for a pretty important cause, right? [applause]i can't. . hear you. [applause] today marks a somber moment in our country's history. we remember that 55 million americans have died as a result of legalized abortion in the last four decades. 55 million. this makes up about a fix of our current adulation in the united states of america. even the center for disease control and prevention reported that about one in five people are not allowed to live annually in the united states because of abortion. abortion truly is the human rights abuse of today. [applause] and abortion is not good for women. experience, science, and research continue to show what common sense already tells us. abortion takes the life of a baby and wounds its mother and father. it is a somber moment. and yet, i believe that we are seeing s
, the city of clinton was in the midst of a civil rights struggle. after what and restored a black neighborhood was firebombed, police officers and firefighters arrived to extinguish the flames but came under gunfire. an african-american teen was killed by police that night, a white man was shot and killed the next day. the national guard moved in. nine black men and one white woman were rounded up, hustled off to jail for their alleged involvement. the young defendants, the majority just high school age, were collectively sentenced to a total of more than 280 years in prison. rev. ben chavis served more than five years in prison. shortly after he appeared on "democracy now!" last month, governor perdue issued pardons of innocence for the wilmington 10. the move came after newly surfaced documents revealed the prosecutor in the case made racially biased notes next to potential jurors, writing comments like "kkk good." i asked rev. chavis last night what it felt like to be attending president of the inauguration on dr. martin luther king day, after finally being pardoned. >> this is
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
be there -- >> 70s? >> king would be there with all the other civil rights leaders who are in that moment. >> getting back to what you were saying, rachel, about the corporate profits, you know, the president believes in wall street. he doesn't want to be alien to wall street. he believes it is a vital part of our capitolistic system. he believes that government has a responsibility not to leave people behind and he also believes that those who have enjoyed the fruits out of our system should pay their fair share. and defining that fair share is going to be done by the population and the mood of the country and what we can do as a country to fix our finances. but he has been an allie to wall street. and he has tried to develop friends on wall street, which has been extremely hard for him, but if he can get these corporations to loosen up their profits and to hire people, then a lot of things would turn around in a heartbeat in this country. getting companies to invest here is one of his priorities. >> there's former president jimmy carter and his wife. immediately before them, as you migh
. it is the right thing to do. in my view, this is a human rights issue of our times. like the civil rights issues of the 1960's. like the women's rights issues before it. it is of a fair and right thing to do is to pass comprehensive immigration reform, that provides a pathway to citizenship for individuals who are here, while also helping young people who were brought here at no fault of their own to be able to complete high school, going to college, serve in the military, and know that they can live and our country without fear of deportation. known as the dream act. and so, those are things that are very important to me. i know you said you are from texas. it is a very important issue. i will be serving on the homeland security committee and that committee has partial jurisdiction over immigration issues, particularly those pertaining to border security, ice, and customs, so we look forward to tackling that an upcoming session. host: representing nevada's fourth district as a democrat. tell us about the district it encompasses. guest: the nevada fourth district is the newest seat that we learn
's rights and civil rights. >> our journey isn't complete until our gay brothers andor t sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. (applause) righ for if we are truly created equal than surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> reporter: the president elevated man-made climate change higher than at any time since winning reelection, resurrecting an issue he's barely touched forly tou more than two years.n two ye >> some may still deny theill deny overwhelming judgment of science bu but none can avoid theg impact devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms.ith 11 mil >> reporter: with 11 million illegal immigrants in america,ngress to mr. obama called on congress topr provide a legal path tohip. citizenship. >> our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. until bright young students and engineers are listed in our work force rather than expelled fromm our country. >> reporter: mr. obama also recalled the newtown shootin
of theecriminal laws in our judgment based on our investiiation." 3 while the state'ss be complete..the civil rights divisioo of the deparrtent of justice has initiated its own livv in downtown baltimore, - keith daniels, fox 45 news at ten. ruled state police must t has - release fiies relating to how they investigate racial profili. argued the documents are personnel reccrds and exempt from disclosure. disclosuree but today the maryland court of appeels civil liberties union and the n-double-a ---p whichh contended the files should be turned over. &pover.the n-dduble-a-c-p says the ruling givee it the abiiity to determine if and when rrports and commlaints are throughly investtgated. whiie.... he... awaits... trial... for... operatinnga boat .. while... &p drunk...//.anne... arundel countyy.. ddleeate... don dwyer... stilll.. on the job... the accidentt.. lass summer... n... he... mathogy riverr../ dwyer .... admitted... e was drunk...//. he... was... hurt... long... with... somm passengers.../// oo... another boat....//// tonite... he... tells fo
rights. take for example the civil war when men fled behind so-called enemy lines to the north, they inserted their humanity with the demand they be allowed to join the union army and fight against the confederacy. and black soldiers in world war i came home to find themselves the targets of lynchings and beatings. why? because they were wearing their uniforms in public. but it was the very fact of their service that w.e.b. du bois believed bound them to the citizenship. but with those citizens at home, w.e.b. du bois wrote, this is the country to which we soldiers of democracy return and this is the fatherland for which we fought, but it is our fatherland. it was right for us to fight. the faults of our country are our faults. make way for democracy, and we saved it in france, and by the great jehovah, we will save nit the united states of america or know the reason why. but it wasn't until world war ii that du bois's imperative would become fully realized, because afric african-american like the tuskegee airmen and the first african-american nurses who j n joined the black n
's the critical part of it, right? when they dig in with their civil lawsuit they unearth more stuff as we found out today in the morgan stanley case. why didn't the government dig in? and let me pause at a theory for you and get your reaction to it. one, these guys give a tremendous amount of money to politicians. dick durban said frankly they own the place and he's the second more senior senator for the democrats in the senate. and they're all in the same circle. attorney general eric holder doesn't think waaaa i'm going to do deals that's my friend bob. i just represented him the other day. i'm not going to put bob in jail. >> there are a lot of political appointees. here eric holder and then lanny brewer chief of the criminal division of justice the man who sits at the crux of all this. there are a lot of justice attorneys who would love nothing more than to bring down a major banger, a major wall street player put a notch on their belt. that's a counter veiling to reality. you say without support from above it's hard for them to act and i think that's very likely true. on the other hand i t
in your "usa today" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil libert
thurman whom hated the civil rights bill so much, mr. dixiecrt that he stood tup on the floor of the senate for 24 hours and 18 minutes before he had to pee and filibuster ended and they voted. but that was the filibuster. now, it's come into something that happens all the time, that is routine that one senate can do to block a measure from coming up a vote. first, they have a vote of whether or not they are going to proceed to a vote. you can filibuster that. you can filibuster the main event, and you don't have to do a filibuster. all you have to say is: i am filibustering this and sit in your office and watch t.v. and nothing happens. it is outrageous. it is undemocratic. it's the tierney of the minority. we talked about this for so long with senators who were determined that not just this term, but last term term before, but this term for sure with democrats having 55 votes, there is no reason why they couldn't fix it. and if i canning it meant either getting rid of the filibuster or making people actually filibuster or roll in cots so the
groups and civil rights groups and some scholars is that we put together this omnibus road to electoral reform bill. it's 199 pages long. it has over 50 important changes, and you named some of them all right. and what we're doing is saying as far as we've come already voting still has a little bit more perfection. we can make it better, make it easier, make it friendly to the voters. that's what some people in politics don't want to do, but that's what those of us that are 160 in number, including senator kirsten gillibrand in new york just introduced, and we'll have our work cut out for us to make the election fair and easier for the american citizen. >> john: is this designed to help democratic voters or do both parties try to play dirty tricks with each other's voters? have democrats tried to suppress republican votes as well? >> we're not angels on the democratic side, but i cannot name you one instance to document that. i don't know about it. and look, all republicans are not all bad guys. a lot of these things are being done by their political organizations by a few elected offic
" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this grewat this-- -- great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil liberties movem
. >>> the controversial plan to limit the size of sugary drinks has hit an unexpected new roadblock. two mayor civil right groups have gone to stop it. jeff glor, good morning. >> good morning to you. not many were surprised to see them oppose it but some were surprised when the spanish deck calculation and the naacp. they said they're doing it not because of race but because of economic fairness. new york city mayor michael bloomberg's plan would but a limit to 16-understand drink in restaurants, sports games, street carts, and movie theaters. it results in $4.7 billion in annual health care costs. 60% of which is paid by the city. >> our administration refuses to stand on the sidelines while millions of our fellow new yorkers struggle with the health implications of being overweight or obese. >> reporter: but the naacp says the mayor's approach is not right. >> the mayor sometime decided that an issue that is important to him should be just a this way or no hazel dukes is the presid. >> the decision is -- >> people can say what they want to. we are on the side of fairness. >> the lawsuit contents the su
legislation that kennedy had introduced that was stalled, that really wasn't going to pass civil rights, the tax cut bill, and in an instant johnson gets it moving towards passage. >> thank you very very very much. >> last fall caro took part in the library of congress book festival on the national mall. it's clear he has made johnson come alive for many readers. >> do you like him? >> i don't like him or dislike him. you are in awe of him because you are constantly saying look what he is doing now. >> he got excited talking about johnson's rise to power as we turn to the final book he is writing now about johnson's president and vietnam, his demeanor has suddenly changed. >> the story is going to turn very dark as soon a
and you have a candidate who said i would do this day vote against the civil rights act. >> john: that was rand paul. i think rand paul is like rick santorum in that he's not running for president but for higher public speaking fees for the rest of his life. it will be hillary against chris christie, a new york senator against a new jersey governor. his views are opposite of most of america. we know over 70% favor abortion rights. chris christie does not. do you think people would realize even a guy they like can have policies they don't like or is charisma more important than ideology? >> is that a trick question? >> john: no, it's a very real question. look at george w. bush. >> we love charisma and we love politicians with swagger. he has done good things with new jersey. you drive through and it even smells better. >> john: who doubt, and who cannot cheer what he has done for sandy victims. >> and the police forces, they love him too. >> john: and we could use that tunnel to manhattan as well. >> to predict anything about what chris christie's bigger play is on the national s
, but -- >> look at all the changes people said couldn't happen. civil rights, women's rights, don't ask don't tell. sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. change will happen when we work for it as a country. >> let us come together from across in nation, reinstate the assault weapons ban. [ applause ] >> reporter: speakers called for limiting the size of ammunition clips and for requiring background checks for all gun sales. after the massacre at sandy hook elementary school, d.c.'s congressional delegate said the onus is now on ordinary citizens to get involved. >> no more moaning. it's time to do something about it. [ applause ] >> reporter: in the crowd there were a few people who opposed restricting assault weapons or ammunition magazines or requiring background checks for all gun purchases. >> this will not work or make a difference. >> reporter: what will make a difference? >> prosecute guys who commit the crimes. >> reporter: a minister asked the crowd to pray in the direction of the white house for the success of the administration's to control guns. arnie duncan reminded participants it wil
in the first layperson to deliver an inaugural invocation. she is the widow of medgar evers, the civil-rights activist who was assassinated 50 years ago. >> 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit of our ancestors, which has allowed us to move from a nation of unborn hopes and history of disenfranchised folks to today's expiration of a more perfect union the a-expression of a more perfect union. we ask that where our paths seem blanketed by oppression and rippled by pangs of despair, we ask for your guidance toward the light of deliverance. and hose who came before us and dreamed of this day, that we recognize that their visions still inspire us. they are a great cloud of witnesses, unseen by the naked eye, but all around us, thankful that they're living was not in vain. for every mountain, you gave us the strength to climb, your grace is pleaded to continue that climb for america and the world. >> myrlie evers delivering the inaugural invocation. o misled, president of emmett if his inaugural address. >> week, the peop
is committed to civil rights and to the advancement of the 26th legislative district where show served. she is also a trail blader for african-american women in politics in prince george's county, maryland. she remains in critical condition. folks are praying for her recovery from annapolis to prince george's county. this woman is a legend. police are -- fire is still working to to try to figure out what caused the fire. it is not considered suspicious. reportic live in temple hills. >>> an usual in move in the murder trial of a former culpepper virginia police officer. tomorrow the jurors will be visiting the scene of is the shooting. daniel harmon wright is charged with shooting patricia cook as she drove away from a church parking lot. he claimed he acted in self-defense. today a witness, ann skyler testified she saw the shooting. she said the officer was never stuck in the car's window, never dragged, and never in the past of cook's jeep. >>> red light cameras do get drivers to stop at intersections. is the insurance institute for highway safety released a new stilledy. the report found
filibuster is part of the tradition. how is that the -- >> part of the tradition of blocking civil rights legislation, right? it's not like -- it was a fairly effective method of blocking all sorts of legislation. >> that's true. >> i mean, at the same time, look, the republicans what they wanted most and they have claimed that the reason they filibuster everything is that harry reid hasn't allowed them to offer amendments. to your point about filling the amendment tree. they got what they wanted most. now harry reid will not be able to prevent them from offering amendments. he will have to let both sides offer two amendments medical record to move a bill past the first filibuster, and this isn't the filibuster. this is just to begin debate on an item. i mean, i think republicans ms instance got exactly the thing they wanted most. i'm not sure what democrats got. i agree with keeping the filibuster itself because democrats may need is one day, but i think more reform than this was warranted. >> we have no idea where 20141 going to happen. there are a lot of vulnerable democrats that will
. and then the third element was his expansion of civil rights where he talked about immigrants and gays and even shoehorned gun rights under the rubric of the security. he outlined the liberal agenda, the big-government agenda of the future. >>gretchen: i think there were two words that came out of it that summarized what charles was saying was that the president yesterday used these two words: collective action. if you parse those two words, it could bring you back to how he started in his career as a community organizer. >>steve: bob schieffer from cbs said there were no memorable lines in this speech. i think what is memorable is what his political director at cbs said in offering advice in a "slate" magazine column to the president. go for the throat of the g.o.p. listen. >> this article should scare anybody who has any doubts whatsoever about the media's impartiality. he is the news director, political director -- excuse me -- for cbs news. he writes a piece in which he calls for essentially an antidemocratic action. depoliticize the g.o.p. action. he believes obama at to delegitimize. it
state senate. virginia republicans waited until this one particular democratic senator, a noted civil rights lawyer named henry marsh, they waited until senator marsh left town on monday for the day to go to the inauguration of president obama. virginia republicans had to wait until he was gone because the state senate is equally divided in virginia, 20 republicans and 20 democrats. but with henry marsh gone for the day, it's no longer an even divide, right? it's 20-19. with that advantage, republicans decided to spring on the senate and spring on the entire state a whole new set of redmaps. a whole new set of gerrymandered maps for the state, drafted to put republicans in charge in virginia effectively permanently. because they did it when henry marsh was away, republicans succeeded in this plan by one vote. in their stealth attack to change the maps. that one vote was the missing vote of the senator who had gone to the inauguration. that's how they started the week. now virginia republicans are moving on to the next part of it. they're moving on to the electoral college scheme part
takes legislation that kennedy introduced, that was stalled, really was not going to pass, civil rights, the tax cut bill, and, in an instant, johnson gets it moving towards passage. >> thank you very much. >> chris: last fall, he took part in a library of congress book festival, on the national mall. and it was clear he made johnson come alive for many readers. >> chris: do you like him? >> i don't like him or dislike him, you are in awe of him because you are constantly saying, look what he's doing now! >> chris: he got excited talking about johnson's rist, as we tur book, he's writing now, about johnson's presidency and vietnam, his demeanor suddenly changed. >> the story is going to turn very dark as soon as vietnam enters the picture. it is sort of a tragic story. a story of his great dreams, that are destroyed by a war. >> chris: you are 76 now. do you ever worry that you are not going to have time to finish the last book? >> well, sure! but, you know, it is not productive to think like that. >> chris: how long do you think it will take you to finish? >> i could say three or four
holiday honoring the slain civil rights leader. now, when the president takes the oeath of office, he's going to use a bible that belonged to dr. king. the president and vice president joe biden honored the nation's fallen soldiers today as well during a wreath laying ceremony at arlington national cemetery. it took place shortly after the vice president was sworn in. >> this is the president aes day and the president's moment in the spotlight but when the ceremony is done, all the parties, mr. obama will still have to deal with the republican led house of representatives, divided government in washington. sharon peter king of new york, the congressman with the best last name in congress, is with us this evening. mr. chairman, it's good to see you. as a republican and a member of a republican caucus that has had its own internal nights in recent days, what can the president do? he's a democrat. you know the partisanship. what can he do to hit a reset button. >> the partisanship is there. from the president's perspective, i think he should not be, i don't know if arrogant is the right
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 78 (some duplicates have been removed)